Past

Advertising to Art

From Advertising to Art: 19th Century Trade Cards and the Unfettered American Imagination
November 19, 2019 – January 5, 2020
Opening reception: Friday, November 22 from 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Gallery talk with Dr. Lenore Metrick-Chen: Friday, November 22 at 6:00 p.m.

The 270 original American advertising cards in this exhibition explore 19th century social and visual culture. The cards reflect a time of cultural change and cultural anxiety as America shifted from an agrarian to an industrial economy and into an emerging world power. In the course of advertising all sorts of new commodities, card artists created wildly inventive new visual languages of montage and proto-surrealism in which human forms merged with animals, vegetables, machines and fruit. The result could be demonizing and dehumanizing or it could convey a carnivalesque sense of magic, shifting visual culture from the Victorian moralizing realistic style towards Modernism.

From Advertising to Art was originally curated by Dr. Lenore Metrick-Chen, an art and cultural historian, for display at Drake University. Metrick-Chen’s ongoing study of the impact of Chinese in Western art recently culminated in her publication, Collecting Objects/Excluding People: Chinese Subjects and American Visual Culture, 1830–1900.


James Hearst in Prose

James Hearst in Prose
November 7 – December 29
Public discussion with UNI curatorial students: Thursday, November 7 at 4:00 p.m. with an opening reception to follow from 5:00-6:30 p.m.

Though James Hearst was known primarily as a poet, during his long literary career he also wrote essays, journalism, fiction and a memoir. This exhibition explores many lesser-known facets of James Hearst’s writing and offers an introduction to the work of one of Cedar Falls’ literary greats. This exhibition was prepared in conjunction with graduate English students in the UNI Department of Languages & Literatures, under the advisement of Professor Jim O’Loughlin.


Caylin Graham Exhibition

Caylin Jayde:
Extirpations in the Anthropocene

October 3–31, 2019
*(date has been extended through November 3)
Opening Reception: October 10 from 5:00–6:00 p.m. with artist’s remarks at 5:45 p.m.

In Extirpations in the Anthropocene, artist Caylin Jayde shares a series of new oil paintings borne out of her interest in our local ecosystem. As the 2019 Hartman Reserve Visiting Artist, Caylin researched endangered species found in Black Hawk County, working with the Black Hawk Wildlife Rehabilitation Project, the UNI Museum, and biologists and naturalists from across the Midwest. The work on display depicts creatures isolated and threatened by their diminishing habitats. The annual Hartman Reserve Visiting Artist program offer an individual or ensemble in search of creative endeavors the opportunity to pursue their artistic discipline while being surrounded by Hartman Reserve’s inspiring landscape and wildlife. Partners and sponsors for the 2019 round of the program are: Catherine Ann Livingston Fund at the Community Foundation of Northeast Iowa, Hearst Center for the Arts, Friends of Hartman Reserve and Friends of the Waterloo Center for the Arts.


Teddi Finiegan

Fiber Form: Works by Teddi Finegan
September 27 – November 3, 2019
Opening reception: Sunday, September 29 from 1:00–3:00 p.m.

Works are drawn from private collections, the University of Northern Iowa, the Hearst Permanent Collection and the artist herself. Teddi Finegan, fiber artist, studied weaving with Roy Ginstrom and Malin Selander of Sweden and completed an M.A. in Art at UNI in 1971. She earned a B.S. from the Ohio State University and attended Penland School of Crafts. In her career, Teddi received several awards and is represented in numerous public and private collections.


Clayton Fowler

Clayton Fowler Watercolors
September 6 – October 27, 2019

Clayton Fowler (American, 1912–1984) was an artist, art historian, lecturer and instructor who taught at both the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls and at St. Lawrence University in New York. On display are watercolors from the Hearst Permanent Collection, the Collection of Dean and Geraldine Schwarz of Decorah, and the University of Northern Iowa Gallery of Art Permanent Collection.